New Strategies for Digital Movements, Policy and Election Technology

New Strategies for Digital Movements, Policy and Election Technology

New Strategies for Digital Movements, Policy and Election Technology

In photo: Cheryl Contee, Anita Jackson, Brandi Collins, Betsy Hoover, and Michael Turk at GET Summit 2017.

With each new election season and social media algorithmic adjustment, new strategies must evolve for engaging the digital movements events inspire. As civil society becomes more aware of the role it must play in safeguarding the integrity of our elections, what advice do digital experts have to offer? How do they predict the emerging election integrity movement will actually impact the future administration of elections?

That was the topic of a panel I recently moderated earlier at UC Hastings’ GET Summit with four fantastic panelists — Brandi Collins, Campaign Director at ColorOfChange; Betsy Hoover, Partner at 270 Strategies; Anita Jackson, Director of Social Media Strategy at MomsRising.org; and Michael Turk, President of Opinion Mover Strategies. Election technology is an important issue that is engaging a lot of attention, and it was a full house at the conference.

Let’s keep up the important discussion on:

  • The role of Facebook microtargeting and misinformation — did that play a role in GOTV in 2016?
    What role should Silicon Valley companies such as Facebook, Google, and Amazon (whose owner also owns the Washington Post) play? What responsibility should they have?
  • How do we take the skills that exist on the coasts to battleground states and hyperlocal campaigns?
  • Is the internet radicalizing people? Is the filter bubble fragmenting or mushrooming movements? Has internet technology made movement building different than in the past?
  • Let’s discuss the perceived disconnect between slacktivism and activism — how do you move someone from hashtag activism and get feet on the ground? How do you generate something beyond visibility?
    Are there examples out there of interesting election-related tech you’re seeing on the progressive or conservative side?
  • Is there tech that should exist that would make your work easier? Is it tech or is it information (like Indivisible Guide)?
  • Text messaging in 2016 was powerful, for example the Hustle texting platform — what are other tools that we can view in a new way?
  • Many tools are too expensive for smaller campaigns. Not everyone is a 6-figure revenue organization! Should cost be important for diversifying candidates and increasing democratic access?
  • For campaigns considering voter suppression / discouragement technology – should we talk about what is possible vs. what is ethical in tech? What democratic values should underpin our movement building as we create digital movement technology?

 

Let me know if you’d like to chat about YOUR digital movement building!

About the author: Cheryl Contee @ch3ryl is Co-Founder and CEO of Fission Strategy, and Co-Founder of Attentive.ly and #YesWeCode. Email Cheryl with any Q’s here: cheryl [at] fissionstrategy.com. Fission builds digital movements that succeed through the power of people by bringing the best of Silicon Valley startup culture to nonprofits.

 

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